HOW TO MAKE POWDERED EGGS (Being Able To Make Your Own Powdered Eggs Is a Handy Skill to Know)

powdered eggs

While you may not use it often, being able to make your own powdered eggs is a handy skill to know. For instance, if you’ve got a chicken coop and want to be able to store your extra eggs long term, powdering the eggs would be an excellent option. Making powdered eggs is also a great idea for backpackers, hikers, and campers, as powdered eggs are very lightweight and don’t need to be refrigerated. While it’s true that you can buy powdered eggs pretty readily, it’s always nice to know how to do it yourself!

So there are two ways to make powdered eggs, and each way has its pros and cons. The first method uses eggs that have already been cooked, and the second uses raw eggs. The first method is good because it’s relatively quick to do, plus you don’t have to worry about any bacteria hanging around in your eggs. The second method takes quite a bit longer, but the end product more closely resembles the texture of an egg when reconstituted.

“How long can you keep eggs” is the question people always ask. Eggs are perishable and must be stored in the refrigerator or freezer. Many factors can affect how long eggs last. When properly handled and stored, eggs rarely spoil. However, if you keep them too long, they are likely to dry up. These fresh egg storage tips below help you learn how to properly store eggs to last.

Refrigerator Storage: Refrigerate eggs at 40°F or less. Store them in their original carton on an inside shelf and away from pungent foods. The temperature on an inside shelf remains more constant than one on the door, which is opened and closed frequently. The carton keeps the eggs from picking up odors or flavors from other foods and helps prevent moisture loss.

Raw eggs that have been removed from their shells should be refrigerated in a tightly covered container. Refrigerated whole egg yolks should be covered with water to prevent them from drying out; drain before using. The following chart shows how long hard-boiled eggs and raw eggs last when stored in the refrigerator.

Eggs Refrigerator (35°F to 40°F)
Raw whole eggs (in shell) 4 to 5 weeks beyond the pack date or about 3 weeks after purchase
Raw whole eggs (slightly beaten) Up to 2 days
Raw egg whites Up to 4 days
Raw egg yolks Up to 2 days
Hard-boiled eggs (in shell) Up to 1 week
Hard-boiled eggs (peeled) Use the same day for best quality

 

Both methods involve the use of a food dehydrator, which is a handy machine to have for a ton of reasons. I found mine at Costco for around $40, but I’m sure there are some cheaper options out there too.

Powdered eggs are made in a spray dryer much in the same way that powdered milk is made. The finished product is a free flowing powder that reconstitutes into a product similar to fresh whipped eggs.

Here are some of my favorite canning recipes. I guess they are my favorites because I grow many of these items myself in my garden and orchard. You can also find literally hundreds of canning recipes, and more information on canning techniques in The Lost Ways

Things You’ll Need

  •  1/2 dozen eggs
  •  Bowl
  •  Whisk
  •  Nonstick pan
  •  Food dehydrator
  • Blender
  •  Airtight container

Without using anything in the nonstick pan, I cooked the scrambled eggs until all visible moisture was

gone and then a little more. During the cooking process I chopped the eggs up as small as I could so the heat would cook the moisture out.


Then I put all the eggs into a food processor and chopped them as small as they would go. This is one of the steps I did not do before.


Right out of the food processor and right on the dehydrator tray they went.


I spread the cooked and finely chopped eggs evenly all over the tray. Eighteen eggs should fill up two trays.


The dehydrator was set on 145 degrees overnight. The end result was crispy burnt orange egg crumbles.


A Christmas gift from years ago finally came to use. It worked fantastic on grinding the eggs into a powder. My mom uses her grain mill and says it works even better.


It looks just like corn mill when it’s all said and done. All eighteen eggs did not even fill up a pint sized mason jar.
I will vacuum the jar lids to the jar and label the top with the date. All I can Say is that it is about time I got it.

What Are The Different Types of Powdered Eggs?

Whole Powdered Eggs

Whole powdered eggs contain the whole egg (whites and yolk) and are very versatile in baking. They can be added with the dry ingredients when baking and act exactly like the “real thing” would act in the recipe – this is because they are the “real thing.” Whole egg powder can be used successfully to make mayonnaise. It thickens pudding just like fresh eggs, and can be used to make omelets and scrambled eggs. They can even be used to make Eggnog.

Powdered Egg Mix

Powdered egg mix is mostly whole egg powder with a bit of powdered milk and vegetable oil blended into the powder. The powdered egg mix has been formulated to make scrambled eggs, omelets or French toast. It is especially well suited for camping trips and other outings.

Once Opened, How Long Will Powdered Eggs Last?

Stored in the absence of oxygen and placed in a cool storage environment, powdered eggs have a storage life of 5 to 10 years. Once a container of powdered eggs has been opened, it is comparable to any other dehydrated dairy product and shelf-life would be measured in weeks or a month. Many people opt to refrigerate the remaining portion or only open as small a container as possible. If the goal is to keep the remaining powdered eggs long-term, we recommend that you re-pack the remaining portion in a smaller container with an oxygen absorber. Keep in mind that the eggs will only store as well as the condition of the original product – and therefore, should be free of moisture and oxygen.

 


 

Our grandfathers had more knowledge than any of us today and thrived even when modern conveniences were not available. They were able to produce and store their food for long periods of time. The Lost Ways is the most comprehensive book available. All the knowledge our grandfathers had, in one place.Here’s just a glimpse of what you’ll find in the book:

The Lost Ways is a far–reaching book with chapters ranging from simple things like making tasty bark-bread-like people did when there was no food-to building a traditional backyard smokehouse… and many, many, many more!

 

Books can be your best pre-collapse investment.

 

The Lost Ways (Learn the long forgotten secrets that helped our forefathers survive famines,wars,economic crisis and anything else life threw at them)

Survival MD (Best Post Collapse First Aid Survival Guide Ever)

Conquering the coming collapse (Financial advice and preparedness )

Liberty Generator (Build and make your own energy source)

Backyard Liberty (Easy and cheap DIY Aquaponic system to grow your organic and living food bank)

Bullet Proof Home (A Prepper’s Guide in Safeguarding a Home )

Family Self Defense (Best Self Defense Strategies For You And Your Family)

 Survive Any Crisis (Best  Items To Hoard For A Long Term Crisis)

Survive The End Days (Biggest Cover Up Of Our President)

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