How To Survive The Apocalypse, Anything Can Happen In A Land Without Laws Or Organized Government – Your Survival Depends On Your Ability

Apocalypse

How To Survive The Apocalypse

So the apocalypse arrived and the world as we know it has come to an end. What to do next?

Assuming you’re one of a handful of survivors, do you have what it takes to make it more than a couple of winters and maybe even sow the seeds for the rebirth of humanity? [Read more…]

How to Make And Use Liquid Manure Compost

Compost

How to Make And Use Liquid Manure Compost

Manure tea – doesn’t that just sound like something you’d like to have some crumpets with? Well, no.

But your garden will most definitely enjoy a cup, so today we’re going to talk about how to make and use your very own manure tea to get the best out of your crops.

Don’t mistake manure tea with compost tea; they’re two completely different beasts. Compost tea is all about microorganisms that are beneficial to both soil and plants. Manure tea is all about the nutrients in manure. [Read more…]

How To Build A DIY Portable Solar Power Generator (For Under $200)

Generator

How To Build A DIY Portable Solar Power Generator (For Under $200)

Have you ever gone on a camping trip with non preppers?

 

This project was born from a camping with my better half and a group of friends. These friends are not of our prepper mindset and as such had no way to recharge their phones, batteries or run any kind of device that required power.

(Personally, I welcome the screen-free days.)

We were camping for 5 days so it wasn’t long before they started to come to me to use my inverter. I normally have a small 150w stashed in the trunk for emergencies, or times like these. [Read more…]

Homemade Water Wheel Electric Generator

Electric Generator

Homemade Water Wheel Electric Generator

A medium size water wheel electric generator can provide enough electricity for one house (3 bulbs, one TV and one radio all running at the same time). Not only you will no longer dependent on the power grid, but you’ll have electricity when SHTF and more important: absolutely FREE. Unlike solar panels, a water wheel electric generator can produce electricity 24/7.

Hydroelectricity is the world’s largest and cleanest source of renewable energy. But despite lively interest in renewables generally, there is an information vacuum about the smallest version of the technology dubbed “the simplest, most reliable and least expensive way to generate power off grid.” [Read more…]

12 Potentially Life-Threatening Errors You’re Making in Food Preparedness and Survival Strategies

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Although armed with good intentions, most preppers and survivalists are making critical errors — perhaps fatal errors — in their food preparedness strategies.

This article is designed to help you identify and correct those errors as quickly as possible so that you’re in good shape before the food collapse arrives. When will that be, exactly? It depends on whom you believe: geologists say the world’s primary irrigation aquifers have maybe 20 – 30 years of water remaining, after which the global food supply collapses. Some environmentalists say radical weather, droughts, floods and heat waves have already started wreaking havoc on the food supply (just look at California right now). People concerned about GMOs and genetic pollution point out that runaway crop diseases could strike at any time and devastate global crop production. Finally, those who are more concerned about government tyranny correctly point out that the federal government has already asserted executive order control over all food, farms and livestock.

Only the wildly ignorant don’t store extra food for emergency preparedness. Even the federal government’s Ready.gov program urges people to “have a plan” and make a disaster supplies kit which contains, “at least a three-day supply of non-perishable food” — just enough to keep you alive until FEMA arrives and screws everything up.

[Read more…]

Build this open source DIY wind turbine for $30

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Getting started with home wind energy projects can set you back a pretty penny if you buy a finished product, but if you’re a little bit handy and don’t mind scrounging for materials and getting creative in the garage or backyard, you can try your hand at building one of these DIY wind turbines for about $30 in materials. After all, it is #iheartrenewables week!

We’ve previously covered Daniel Connell’s open source concentrated solar collector plans, but now he’s back with another great DIY renewable energy project, a vertical axis wind turbine based on the Lenz2 lift+drag design. Connell’s design calls for using aluminum lithographic offset printing plates to catch the wind, which he says can be obtained cheaply (or possibly even free) from an offset printing company, and a variety of hardware and a bicycle wheel.

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“The turbine uses the ~40% mechanically efficient Lenz2 lift+drag design. It is made entirely from scrap materials except for the bolts and pop rivets, and should cost about $15-$30 for the three vane version, which can be made by one person in six hours without much effort.

Other than basic tools, including a hand drill, you’ll need to buy or borrow a pop riveter and some assorted hardware (bolts, nuts, and washers) to construct this device. According to Connell’s notes, this DIY wind turbine, which can be built in either a three vane or six vane version, has successfully survived sustained winds of 80 km/h (three vane) and up to 105 km/h for the six vane version.

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Here’s a little clip of the vertical axis wind turbine being challenged by strong winds:

In order to harvest the energy from this wind turbine, it’s necessary to add an alternator to the rotor, as well as a method of storing the electricity, but it could also be used simply for the mechanical rotation, such as to pump water or spin a flywheel for other applications.

While there are a number of variables that can affect the output of this DIY wind turbine, including the efficiency of the alternator used (and obviously the speed of the wind where it’s located), according to Connell, using a “50% efficient car alternator (the simplest and cheapest option) should produce 158 watts of electricity in a 50 km/h wind, and 649 watts at 80 km/h” with this design.

[Update: In an email conversation with Connell, he stated that “a six vane version with an efficient alternator should produce at least 135 watts of electricity in a 30 km/h wind, and 1.05 kilowatts at 60 km/h.”]

This homebrewed wind turbine isn’t necessarily going to be powering your home (although a series of these could potentially be used to generate enough electricity to charge a battery bank for modest home use), it might be a great hands-on school project or homeschool activity about wind energy.

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Other useful resources:

Blackout USA (EMP survival and preparedness)

Conquering the coming collapse (Financial advice and preparedness )

Liberty Generator (Build and make your own energy source)

Backyard Liberty (Easy and cheap DIY Aquaponic system to grow your organic and living food bank)

Bullet Proof Home (A Prepper’s Guide in Safeguarding a Home )

Derek Markham (@derekmarkham)
Technology / Wind Technology

How to make Ethanol Fuel Basics

images (1)Ethanol is a renewable fuel made from various plant materials collectively known as “biomass.” More than 95% of U.S. gasoline contains ethanol in a low-level blend to oxygenate the fuel and reduce air pollution.

Ethanol is also available as E85, or high-level ethanol blends. This fuel can be used in flexible fuel vehicles, which can run on high-level ethanol blends, gasoline, or any blend of these.

There are several steps involved in making ethanol available as a vehicle fuel:

  • Biomass feedstocks are grown, collected and transported to an ethanol production facility
  • Ethanol is produced from feedstocks at a production facility and then transported to a blender/fuel supplier
  • Ethanol is mixed with gasoline by the blender/fuel supplier and distributed to fueling stations.

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Ethanol as a vehicle fuel is not a new concept. Henry Ford and other early automakers suspected it would be the world’s primary fuel before gasoline became so readily available. Today, researchers agree ethanol could substantially offset our nation’s petroleum use. In fact, studies have estimated that ethanol and other biofuels could replace 30% or more of U.S. gasoline demand by 2030.

The use of ethanol is required by the federal Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS).

Fuel Properties

Ethanol (CH3CH2OH) is a clear, colorless liquid. It is also known as ethyl alcohol, grain alcohol, and EtOH. (See Fuel Properties search.) Ethanol has the same chemical formula regardless of whether it is produced from starch- and sugar-based feedstocks, such as corn grain (as it primarily is in the United States), sugar cane (as it primarily is in Brazil), or from cellulosic feedstocks (such as wood chips or crop residues).

Ethanol has a higher octane number than gasoline, providing premium blending properties. Minimum octane number requirements prevent engine knocking and ensure drivability. Low-level ethanol blends generally have a higher octane rating than unleaded gasoline. Low-octane gasoline is blended with 10% ethanol to attain the standard 87 octane requirement. Ethanol is the main component in high-level ethanol blends. (See E85 Specification to learn more.)

Per unit volume, ethanol contains about 30% less energy than gasoline. E85 contains about 25% less energy than gasoline. High-level ethanol blends contain less energy per gallon than does gasoline, to varying degrees, depending on the volume percentage of ethanol in the high-level blend.

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Ethanol Energy Balance

In the United States, ethanol is primarily produced from the starch in corn grain. Recent studies using updated data about corn production methods demonstrate a positive energy balance for corn ethanol, meaning that fuel production does not require more energy than the amount of energy contained in the fuel

Cellulosic ethanol, which is produced from non-food-based feedstocks, is expected to improve the energy balance of ethanol, because non-food-based feedstocks are anticipated to require less fossil fuel energy to produce ethanol. Biomass used to power the process of converting non-food-based feedstocks into cellulosic ethanol is also expected to reduce the amount of fossil fuel energy used in production. Another potential benefit of cellulosic ethanol is that it results in lower levels of life cycle greenhouse gas emissions.

Other useful resources:

Blackout USA (EMP survival and preparedness)ec_250x200_nf3-60ec08d

Conquering the coming collapse (Financial advice and preparedness )

Liberty Generator (Build and make your own energy source)

Backyard Liberty (Easy and cheap DIY Aquaponic system to grow your organic and living food bank)

How To Build A Solar Electric Garden Fence

imagesGaining food independence is a big step in our overall effort to become self-reliant. Maintaining a good food supply is crucial to being able to both survive and thrive in a post-disaster society.

Growing your own food is one of the best ways to reach your goal in this area, but sometimes little critters can pose a big problem. A standard fence may keep rabbits, deer and other animals out of your garden; but an electric fence will probably be much more effective.

Of course, an electric fence is going to be more expensive than a standard fence, but there’s a way to solve that issue. An easy fix that uses that great big power plant in the sky — the sun — is a low-maintenance solar electric fence. And it’s even less expensive if you build it yourself.

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Your cost for a solar electric fence should be about $200, assuming your home garden is roughly 50 feet by 50 feet. And this system should last for at least 10 years, so the cost of protecting your food source is very low.

Here’s what you’ll need to build your solar electric fence, and nearly everything is available at ranch supply stores, acehardware.com or spheralsolar.com:

  • 200 feet of polytape or electric wire
  • 24 fiberglass support rods and plastic insulators
  • 4000+ volt fence charger with 12VDC input
  • Copper rod for grounding the system
  • Deep cycle battery from a boat or marine store
  • 5w-10w 12VDC solar panel for charging the battery
  • Deer repellent and cloth strips.

Installation is relatively easy. Start off by driving the corner posts around the outside perimeter of the garden. Then, space the remaining poles 8 to 12 feet between the corner posts to keep the charged wire tight. Next, string the wire between the posts about 3 feet off the ground, or higher depending on your critter problem. You can also run several lines around the posts at varying levels if you are concerned about rodents and rabbits.

Before connecting the wires to the fence charger, attach repellent-soaked rags about every 4 feet along the wire. This will ensure that deer won’t try to jump your wire setup and will stay clear. You may also want to set up a “gate” where you can enter the garden without turning off the fence. Then, attach the fence wire and grounding rods per the instructions on your fence charger.

Finally, connect the fence charger input to the 12 VDC battery and attach the appropriate leads from the solar panel to the same terminals on the battery. With a simple setup like this and a fence that is presumably on most of the time, you shouldn’t need a charge controller. If you take the fence down for the winter, then also disconnect your battery and solar panel, and store them in a safe place.

It’s a good idea to test your fence occasionally to make sure it’s still running. I shouldn’t have to tell you, but don’t do this with your hand! Use a simple $5 voltage meter. If you notice that your wires are often dead, you may need an additional solar panel and battery. This is common for longer fences and fences that are often touched by animals.

Now you can enjoy your garden and its bounty without worrying about your furry friends ruining dinner.

Other useful resources:BL_051

Survive Attack to Our Power Grid System (Weapon That Can Instantly End Modern Life in America)

Survival MD (Best Post Collapse First Aid Survival Guide Ever)

Backyard Innovator (A Self Sustaining Source Of Fresh Meat,Vegetables And Clean Drinking Water)

Blackout USA (EMP survival and preparedness)

Conquering the coming collapse (Financial advice and preparedness )

Liberty Generator (Build and make your own energy source)

Backyard Liberty (Easy and cheap DIY Aquaponic system to grow your organic and living food bank)

Bullet Proof Home (A Prepper’s Guide in Safeguarding a Home )

Family Self Defense (Best Self Defense Strategies For You And Your Family)

 Survive Any Crisis (Best  Items To Hoard For A Long Term Crisis)

Survive The End Days (Biggest Cover Up Of Our President)

Drought USA(Discover The Amazing Device That Turns Air Into Water)

SOURCE : personalliberty.com

How to Make a Smoke Grenade

How-to-make-a-smoke-grenade-2-890x395When Should You Use a Smoke Grenade

A smoke grenade may help in different situations. First developed in 1848 by inventor Robert Yale, nowadays smoke grenades have many more uses than their original purpose (fireworks). Smoke grenades are also used by the Military for creation of smoke screens in case of a retreat or flanking maneuvers in order to provide a wall of visual distraction that reduces the accuracy of enemy fire. More so the Army uses smoke grenades to signal their position for air supported attacks.

Non-military uses of smoke grenades vary from signaling your position in case you are lost to fireworks, paintball games, self-defense, protests, spectators, airsoft enthusiasts. However, the smoke grenade class is restricted to signaling and concealment under the laws of war, and thus they are not considered weapons; since the vast majority is non-explosive, the smoke grenade remain legal for civilian use and ownership in most countries. You should be aware that you are fully responsible of these smoke grenades and you should always light them up in a place where things cannot catch fire.

[Read more…]

10 Tips on How to Make the Most of Your Small Garden Space

When it comes to having a garden we don’t all have acres and acres of land to work with. Some of us only have small backyard plots or even smaller patio areas. So how can you still have your dream garden in such a small space? Here are some suggestions to make the most of your small garden space:

  1. Pack it in – One thing that many gardeners overlook is that you can pack plants together without harming your harvest if you do it correctly. Some plants just naturally work well together and can stand close quarters. While carrots can’t be packed too close you can plant them next to lettuce without an issue. Since one produces aboveground and the other below there is little damage done to either of them. As long as they have similar harvest schedules or the harvest does not harm the other plants then you are good to go. The square foot method of gardening is a great example of packing a bunch of plants into a small space. Take a look at your desired garden and see what you can uncover. You can also pack flowers and other ornamental plants close together. Not only does this allow you to grow more but it also makes the plants look fuller and more visually attractive.
  2. Companion planting – Companion planting is a great way to naturally get rid of bugs and other pests while still getting the harvest you need. You can uncover lots of companion plants that grow great together but my personal favorite is corn and bean. You can let the beans grow right up the corn stalk. The beans ward off corn predators and attract beneficial bugs. The corn provides the beans with a living trellis and keeps your beans off the ground and safe. By planting them together you also save valuable space in your garden, even with these two large plants.
  3. High and low – Similarly you can plant high plants with low plants. Plants like lettuce require more shade than cucumber. However if you create a growing screen over the lettuce you can plant both at once and reap twice the crop. Let the cucumber vines grow over the lettuce for shade and use the shady ground beneath the cucumber to harvest lots of lettuce. Flowers can also be grown this way. Tall flowers can help shade smaller and more delicate flowers. Shade loving plants can nestle beneath larger sun loving ones.
  4. Keep it small – Another idea for small garden spaces is to pick small plants. There are dwarf varieties of almost every plant, even trees, that produce great tasting food in large quantities. By keeping your plants on the small side you can pack a lot more into those small spaces and get a great harvest. Bay greens and veggies are always a hit and have a wonderful flavor. Best of all many smaller varieties mature faster and are able to be harvested sooner which means you can get even more out of your garden.
  5. Switch out – Speaking of getting more out of your garden by harvesting earlier, why not time your garden’s harvest and replant. When you pick one item, like carrots, why not replace it with something like lettuce? That way you have a double harvest in the same growing period. You can switch out your harvest schedule to make the most of your planning space. As the seasons change rip up nonproducing plants and replace them with new ones. That way you can have a year round harvest without having to have a huge garden.
  6. Stack it up – Stacking pots is a great way to grow a lot in a small space. Like strawberry pots with multiple holes in different heights you can grow many plants in the same pot without being hampered by the diameter of the top. You can stack smaller pots in a larger one for an adorable and useful container garden.
  7. Container gardens – Speaking of container gardens, you can grow a lot in a container. Even if your open growing space is limited you can expand it with containers. In your home, out on the porch, hanging in baskets or in widow boxes there are a variety of container to fit any garden size. Best of all you can grow year round by bringing your plants indoors during the crisp winter days.
  8. Wall gardens – Another method of container gardening is the wall garden. By mounting your containers on the wall you have a vast amount of space to grow without taking up any square feet. Even an apartment dweller can have a wall garden. You can use pots or even gutters to create a perfect wall garden that can effectively expand your garden area up and up. A repurposed pallet can also be mounted or leaned against the wall for a wall garden. Both beautiful and practical wall gardens are gaining in popularity. Use a fence as well!
  9. Vertical gardens – In a similar vein you can also use walls, fences, trellis, wires, cages or other methods to make your garden grow up instead of over. Veggies like tomatoes take up much less space when caged and trained to grow up instead of out with no loss to the fruit production. Cucumbers can grow along trellises as well as other vines like beans. Even squash can grow up and over instead of spreading out and taking up valuable garden space.
  10. Hydroponic – Last but not least is a great way of getting the most out of your garden space. Hydroponic garden systems make for great and productive gardens even without access to good soil. By enclosing the system there are methods to grow almost any plant without having to add additional water or growing solution. This can be a great way to grow whatever you want right there in your home. Keep in mind that enclosed hydroponic systems must remain enclosed, so no rain should be allowed in the system. A green house or simple clear covering can protect you outdoor plants. If you grow indoors then no covering is needed. I have seen huge cucumber plants grown out of a trash barrel with this system and yards and yards of gourmet lettuce. It is definitely something to consider.

As you can see there are many way that you can make even a small garden into a productive and beautiful space. From using vertical growing methods to companionplanting there are many ways to make the most of your small garden.

 

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SOURCE : /humbleseed.com

 

 

About the Author:

Humble Seed welcomes guest bloggers- this post was written by Ken Myers. He holds a master’s in business leadership from Upper Iowa University and multiple bachelor degrees from Grand View College.  As president of morningsidenannies.com, Ken’s focus is helping Houston-based parents find the right childcare provider for their family. When he isn’t working, he enjoys spending time with his three children and his wife.

How to convince someone about prepping

I received an email the other day asking for advice on how to get a loved one on board with prepping.  This is a subject I have wanted to write about for a while because I have had these same thoughts and struggles with various loved ones in my own life as each of you. I won’t try to convince you that I am an expert and there is no book forthcoming, but I do have personal experience of my own challenges of trying to convince someone about prepping and wanted to share this and my perspectives with you. I share these like most of my articles in the hopes that someone reading can gain some small bit of knowledge or a suggestion that may help you in your own personal prepping journey and that this information can equip you to be prepared or make your life easier. [Read more…]

Build A Rocket Stove, Step-By-Step

One common concern for prepping is how you will be able to heat up and cook any food if you don’t have the nice stainless steel range to cook on? You might have a freezer full of the best steaks but they are awful tough eatin (yes that is the correct spelling) if they aren’t cooked to a nice medium rare at a minimum. A great Prep to either have or know how to make is a Rocket Stove.

Rocket Stoves were developed by a man named Sam Baldwin back in the early 80′s. What makes them so great is that the Rocket Stove concept achieves efficient combustion of whatever you are burning (normally small pieces of wood) at a really high temperature. It can do this because the unique design of the Rocket Stove allows a good air draft into the fire and this ensures you have a near complete combustion of the fuel and associated gases. Because of its simple year ingenious design, it has been used for cooking purposes in many third-world locales (notably Rwandan refugee camps) as well as for space and water heating.

LDSPrepper has taken this idea and a [Read more…]

Electricity Free Winter

By Naomi Broderick. Naomi writes for ADT in Odessa, Texas. At home she’s on a prepping mission to assure the safety of her three children.

 

Thinking of the lights going out for a longer period of time is pretty bad in our day and age. We have become so dependent and reliant on energy, living without it would be a true challenge. This would be even more so if you are living in a cold climate during winter. So how do you prepare yourself and your family for the worst case scenario? It’s not easy, but here are a few pointers.

[Read more…]

How To Purify Water – Water Purification Process

“Water, water everywhere and not a drop to drink,” as the old saying goes. A more apt statement for these times might be, “water, water everywhere, but is it safe to drink?” And if it’s not, what is a reliable water purification process?

Sadly, in this day and age there are few, if any, places where the water is safe to drink without treating, no matter how pristine and inviting it may look. [Read more…]

How to Make a Survival Water Filter

iStock_000022215675Small-538x354Is it safe to drink this water? I ask myself that question often and most of the time the answer is no. There often is the risk that bacteria, chemicals and pathogens, specifically giardia, are in the water. Rainwater or dew that is resting on non-poisonous plants such as moss is safe to drink as is. There are a few ways to process water to make it safe to drink: boiling it, using chemical purifiers and filtration. This article will provide tips on how to make and use a survival water filter. [Read more…]

How to Build a Coracle

coracle-6-538x354Once humans developed a need to travel on water in order to fish, trade and explore, cultures worldwide created lightweight boats consisting of the skin of an animal stretched over a light frame of wooden poles or strips. One such boat is the coracle.

This is a boat of the British Isles and is varied in design depending on the locality. Most coracles are round or boxy in shape, and are more or less a basket with the tarred skin of a bullock or horse stretched over it. [Read more…]